Acceptable identification includes:

  • a driver’s license or personal identification card issued to the person by the Department of Public Safety or a similar document issued to the person by an agency of another state, regardless of whether the license or card has expired;
  • a form of identification containing the person’s photograph that establishes the person’s identity;
  • a birth certificate or other document confirming birth that is admissible in a court of law and establishes the person’s identity;
  • United States citizenship papers issued to the person;
  • a United States passport issued to the person;
  • official mail addressed to the person by name from a governmental entity;
  • a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows the name and address of the voter; or any other form of identification prescribed by the Secretary of State.

Voter registration certificate 

  • Once you apply, a voter registration certificate (proof of registration) will be mailed to you within 30 days.
  • Check your certificate to be sure all information is correct. (If there is a mistake, make corrections and return it to the voter registrar immediately.)
  • When you go to the polls to vote, present your certificate as proof of registration.
  • You may vote without your certificate by signing an affidavit at the polling place and showing some other form of identification (for example, driver’s license, birth certificate, copy of electric bill).
  • If you lose your certificate, notify your County Voter Registrar in writing to receive a new one.
  • You will automatically receive a new certificate every two years, if you haven’t moved from the address at which you are registered.

Who can vote in Texas?

To be eligible to register to vote in Texas, a person must be:

  • A United States citizen;
  • A resident of the Texas county in which application for registration is made;
  • At least 18 years old on Election Day;
  • Not finally convicted of a felony, or, if so convicted must have (1) fully discharged the sentence, including any term of incarceration, parole, or supervision, or completed a period of probation ordered by any court; or (2) been pardoned or otherwise released from the resulting disability to vote; and
  • Not determined by a final judgment of a court exercising probate jurisdiction to be (1) totally mentally incapacitated; or (2) partially mentally incapacitated without the right to vote.