The Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce joined with 74 other state and local business associations from 33 different states in filing an amicus brief in the U.S. Supreme Court outlining the devastating economic effects of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) greenhouse gas regulations.  In issuing these regulations, the EPA purports to have the authority to regulate over 6 million new facilities including factories, power plants, bakeries, office buildings, hospitals, multifamily residential buildings, and other “small sources” of greenhouse gases.
“In issuing these regulations, the EPA purports to have the authority to regulate 6 million new facilities, including bakeries, multifamily dwellings, and office buildings,” said Chris Wallace, President/CEO of the Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce. “These regulations present an extremely onerous burden for any business to bear, but they will be particularly devastating for small businesses,” Wallace remarked.
The Greater Irving-Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce argued in its amicus brief that the threat of these invasive and intrusive regulations produce a “chilling effect” that impacts plans for expanding operations, entering into new markets, and developing new products. The Chamber explained that both large and small enterprises will understandably hesitate if growth entails the complexities and costs of regulatory compliance.  And, those that do decide to grow will necessarily pass those costs onto their customers.  The businesses that cannot do so will suffer decreased profits in the midst of the current economic crisis – a setback that can ultimately threaten their survival.
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